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Snapmaker 10W High Power Laser Module Is Here

Nov 19, 2021 | Features

Hi makers,

We have exciting news to share! Nearly one year ago, we created a poll and asked what you want most if you would have won the Snapmaker Makerathon. At that time, the highest vote went to the Rotary Module. And we subsequently introduced the Rotary Module in April 2021. The second-highest vote went to the High Power Laser Module. Now we are here to meet the most urgent need by launching the Snapmaker 10W High Power Laser Module on Nov 19. And we are going to unveil something under the hood! Read till the end.

Why We Launch 10W High Power Laser Module

Without doubt, it is because of YOU. If you are an old friend of ours, you would probably note that our laser module has been through a development process from 200mW to 1600mW and later from 1600mW to 10W. Back in 2016, Snapmaker Original made its debut with the 200mW Laser Module as one of the three functions. Later, Snapmaker 2.0 machines come with the 1600mW Laser Module. Throughout these years, we have witnessed numerous fantastic user showcases realized by our laser modules. At the same time, we have also recognized the growing demand for a high power laser module. Have you ever encountered a situation where the limited capacities and efficiency of our existing laser modules really held your projects back? Have you ever been bothered by the process of locating a focal point? Or have you ever felt that it did take you some time to get a preview of your laser job on the material? Problems like these are the reasons why we launch the 10W High Power Laser Module today.

Why You Should Meet 10W High Power Laser Module

The Most Cutting-edge Laser Beam Splitters

The 10W Laser Module is equipped with the most cutting-edge laser beam splitters. This is why we can make a leap from 5W to 10W. Meanwhile, the work speed of the 10W Laser Module can be as high as 6000 mm/min, while cutting through basswoods as thick as 8 mm. To put that into perspective, the cutting speed is up to 8 times that of the 1.6W Laser Module[1]. You can now play with a wider variety of materials and hammer out more projects.

For more information about the differences between the 1.6W Laser Module and the 10W High Power Laser Module, please refer to our FAQ.

Fast-axis Collimating Lens

Two Fast-axis Collimating (FAC) Lenses are fitted into the 10W Laser Module, resulting in an ultra-fine laser focus (0.05 mm × 0.2 mm). It thus allows for higher energy density, which delivers high-quality laser works with impeccable details. 

Fast-axis Collimating Lens

As seen in the following official showcase, the image of a wolf head is engraved on black anodized aluminum. Thanks to the ultra-fine laser focus, the impeccable details are vividly presented before us.

Official Showcase

Unique Wind Channel 

The unique wind channel inside the 10W Laser Module provides excellent wind pressure, blowing the fumes away as the laser beam cuts into the material, sending the fumes directly into the grids of the Laser Engraving and Cutting Platform, which then get channeled out, reducing their interference on laser machining.

Unique Wind Channel 

Auto Focus + Upgraded Camera Capture + Tailor-made Software

We believe a great product should be great at all levels. Therefore, the 10W Laser Module is powerful not only for its cutting capacities but also for great features that support its better performance. The 10W Laser Module is supported by upgraded Auto Focus, smarter Camera Capture, and software that is more versatile than ever. 

With our new Laser Module, you no longer need to measure the thickness of your material manually; instead, the module will calculate it for you and adjust itself in Z orientation accordingly so that the focal point falls right on the material surface[2]. As for the Camera Capture, the wide-angle HD camera captures your material in one take and lets you get an instant preview in Luban of your laser job on the material. In terms of our tailor-made software Snapmaker Luban, we prepare ready-to-use material profiles for you, through which you can start from scratch and have access to full sets of recommended parameters. Specifically, one of the new features of Luban that we like most is the 3D to 2D conversion which allows you to convert 3D models into cuttable vector images. Things that can only be brought to life by 3D printing can now be laser machined as well.

Official Showcase: convert 3D models into cuttable vector images

Want It Now?

If you are a heavy user of our laser module, it’s time for you to level up your laser module from 1600mW to 10W. If you are new to Snapmaker and get hooked on this powerful module, we believe this 10W High Power Laser Module won’t let you down. It is compatible with all models of the Snapmaker 2.0 series apart from the A150 and will be compatible with upcoming machines. You can use it with other modules and addons as well, including the Rotary Module, Emergency Stop Button, Air Purifier, and CAN Hub. 

Now you can pre-order a 10W High Power Laser Module for less than 400 USD! Our Black Friday Sale also starts today; save up to 450 USD with Snapmaker!

[1] The data are obtained based on the 1.6 mm basswoods. Depending on your material, the cutting speed and depth might vary.

[2]  This feature applies to flat and regularly shaped materials. Materials that are transparent, highly reflective or of red and black color might not be applicable.

Happy laser machining!

Team Snapmaker

4 Comments

  1. Jeremy

    Are you going to publish an updated “definitive Guide” with updated speeds for this new module?

    Reply
  2. Mark

    “work speed of the 10W Laser Module can be as high as 6000 mm/min, while cutting through basswoods as thick as 8 mm”

    The wording of this section technically correct but is a bit misleading. According to your FAQ when cutting the max work speed is 600 not 6000. So yes, it can operate at 6,000 mm/min but only when engraving and yes it can cut 8mm basswood but not at that speed.

    Reply
    • Snapmaker Blog

      hi, thanks for the feedback~~ the work speed here refers to engraving speed.

      Reply

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